08 April 2019

Air Navigation Pro Monthly Inbox - March 2019



Last month, the support team at Air Navigation Pro gathered all the concerns and inquiries from our users. After that, we compiled the top five frequently asked questions for the month of March to make it easier for you to find the answers to these questions.

Here's the Air Navigation Pro Monthly Inbox for March 2019.


1. Where can I find the NOTAMs?

Interactive NOTAMS is a subscription product. For you to have access on it, you need to have a valid subscription in order to request and see briefing. By then, you can display the NOTAMs on the map.

For iPad and tablet, go to Tools >> NOTAMs




For mobile devices, go to Configuration >> Tools >> NOTAMs





2. How can I access my Air Navigation Services account from the device?

In order to connect to your Air Navigation Services account, go to Tools >> Account >> Account information for your iPad/tablet.




If you are using a mobile device, go to Configuration >> Account >> Account information.




If you don't have an account yet, you can create it for free on the Services site.  


3. How can I remove the airspaces name and its associated information? 



In map options, if you enabled the setting for "Display Airspace name", you will see different colored boxes that contains information of a specific airspace, its name, class and vertical limits. If you wish not to display these, you can just disable it.

In order to do so, go to Map >> Airspaces >> toggle off "Display  Airspace name"





4. How can I print my operational flight plan? 

As of the moment, this is only applicable in Air Navigation Pro iOS version specifically on iPad.

First, tap Resize button from the toolbar to display the route summary.


Then, tap the route module icon to show the summary. 


Tap Flight plan to display a document and tap the sharing button from the bottom left for the option to print.



5. Why can't I find the ATC Position Report when I use my mobile device?

The ATC Position Report is applicable on both tablet and iPad, including selected iPhone devices that has wide screen.






If you have questions that are not listed above, feel free to leave a comment below or message us on Facebook or visit our FAQ page and support center .

Are you a pilot with cool travel stories that you want to share? Send us a message on our social media accounts Facebook , Instragram or send us an e-mail at charlyne@airnavigation.aero.


to discover more about the Flight planning application Air Navigation Pro in iOS and Android, 
you can also visit our website at 
and check the manual for additional details on how to use the new features.


Blue Skies, 
The Air Navigation Team
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27 March 2019

Not your typical farm girl: Nina Hardie on the life of being a helicopter muster pilot

Previously, we talked about the Aerial Mustering industry in our latest post. We wanted to know more about it so we looked for some muster pilots in Australia whom we can interview. Our team was lucky to find Nina Hardie, a 34-year old helicopter muster pilot from Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia. Nina shared her insights and experiences of the aerial mustering industry. This is her inspirational pilot story to share with our Air Navigation Pro audience.

Growing up in western Queensland, mustering has always been a large part of Nina's life. Her family owns a cattle property back home where she got all her expertise and knowledge in mustering. She helped her parents and siblings with the mustering work in their station. By then, her passion for the rural industry began.


Before obtaining her license, Nina was already working back and fourth in the cattle industry, namely going between her home and stations in northern QLD. She also travelled to the U.S to work for a leading cutting horse trainer and at a thoroughbred stud. In 2006, she got her Commercial Pilot License and the year after, she started her flying career. Nina's first flying job was on an almost 7,000 sq km (1.7 million acres) station, that had three R22 helicopters to use for mustering. She worked there for three years before moving on to the local commercial mustering company.

Getting into the commercial industry could be difficult for some, considering the amount of skill and training required for the job. But for Nina, being used to working around cattle since she was young was an advantage. It's a prerequisite for anyone who wants to pursue a career in the mustering industry. "Most mustering pilots have handled cattle on the ground before gaining their license. It's not to say that you couldn't be trained to do it if you hadn't had experience on the ground, but it certainly is one of the first things mustering companies look when hiring junior pilots. By having experience working in stock camps and handling cattle, you learn how stations operate and that understanding goes a long way when you start flying and working with people on the ground mustering." 



According to Nina, there is autonomy in the job so you are held accountable for all the actions and decisions that you're going to make. That doesn't just apply in flying the helicopters, but as well as in working with your team, your clients and the animals involved. In order to be qualified, a strong passion for the cattle industry is necessary.

But despite working for years as a muster pilot, Nina says that what makes the job more challenging is that there is always something to learn every day. "There are days that musters run better than others. it depends on the cattle and how they've been handled previously on musters and how we handle them on the day. There are also outside factors that will affect the muster like the weather - if it's hot or windy, the distance you need to take the cattle to the yards and the type of vegetation in the paddock - whether its thick scrub or more open plains, which make the cattle easier to see.  This makes every day different and a challenge! Our aim is to get the cattle to the yards in a way that puts the least amount of stress on them."

We may see the job as a one of a kind profession but just like any other jobs out there, it has its ups and downs as well. For the hardest part, Nina tells us "I think the lifestyle being a mustering pilot brings can be taxing after a few years because you are living where you work. So quite often there isn't any separation from work and home life. Days off aren't rostered and is dependent upon how many stations are mustering that day and the number of machines required. This can make it difficult to plan or commit to anything outside work." 

Gathering the cattle in the yard after days of mustering and moving on to the next station could be like a taste of victory, but there's more than that. "The remote country I get to see that is inaccessible on the ground, the people I get to work with day-to-day and the sunrises and sunsets you witness when flying - it's the best seat in the house. I also find gratifying at the end of the day. And if it doesn't go quite the way you planned, you can learn from your mistakes! We're always learning and only experience can help us get better and better at our job."


When asked if gender is a hindrance for women who aspire to be like her, Nina replies, "I have to disagree! All women are capable of flying and becoming a mustering pilot. I think in the past we have put limitations on women in some jobs because of physical attributes like we're not as strong as men to do a particular job. However, the most physical thing we do as a pilots is "lift up" a 44 gallon fuel drum so we can refuel! For a career in flying, I believe you need to be passionate about what you are doing and have a good mental attitude. You just need to realize that it won't be easy, and it can take a long time to gain the experience - and that's regardless of gender. However, it is worth it in the end! Being a "female" is no longer a valid reason to not do something in this day and age."

She adds, "Although 20 years ago, the industry was very male-dominated. However, times have changed and the mentality within the industry alongside it. I can name 10 female mustering pilots in Australia, and I know there are more, I just haven't met them yet."


Are you a pilot with cool travel stories that you want to share? Send us a message on our social media accounts Facebook , Instragram or send us an e-mail at charlyne@airnavigation.aero .


to discover more about the Flight planning application Air Navigation Pro iOS, 
you can also visit our website at 
and check the manual for additional details on how to use the new features.


Blue Skies, 
The Air Navigation Team
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19 March 2019

Cowboys in Helicopters: Inside the Aerial Mustering Industry


It took a village before to muster livestock, but not anymore. Thanks to these modern day cowboys, it only takes a helicopter and some next level chasing skills.

With vast cattle stations across the Australian Outback, where each station can be thousands of square kilometers, there's no doubt that the mustering of livestock is one of the most difficult jobs there is. Imagine your herd spread across the length and breadth of Wales and the challenges of normal cattle farming methods comes into stark relief.

Mustering targets the rounding up of herds of beef cattle, sheep, horses, camels, buffalo. These animals that roam the station will be gathered once a year for routine livestock health checks, branding, live export and shearing. It is conducted through various methods by the use of horses, vehicles such as utes (Aussie slang for utility vehicles), motorcycles, ATVs (all-terrain-vehicles) and helicopters. The mustering season occurs during the dry season in Australia, between the months of March and November.


Aerial mustering started in the early 1990's and has been consistently growing since then. Mustering from the sky helps reduce the cost in time and money spent in  herding the stock. The Robinson R22 is often the chopper of choice  for these skilled aviators. The mustering pilot will take to the skies in a R22 to locate the roaming cattle and then notify the ground team of its location via CB Radio.

Although it's one of the fastest method to round up livestock, aerial mustering is no different from the ground based mustering process. Just like the other methods, it involves long, hard hours, patience and skills - added with an increased risk of danger. Keeping your cool while flying as low as 5ft AGL at a maintaining speed while keeping na eye on the herd is not an easy job.

An aerial musterer is not just a skilled aviator. A lot of factors are considered in to qualify for the job; it takes both passion in aviation and agriculture, especially in handling livestock, working well in a team and excellent communication skills and quick thinking.

Photo courtesy by Nina Hardie 


According to industry experts, it's much easier to teach a cattleman/cattle-woman to fly than it is to teach a pilot who has no experience with cattle, which makes it the primary reason why it requires an extensive amount of training.

Sure, flying is a challenge but mustering stock is something that you learn in years and there's no room for errors.

Nina Hardie, a Helicopter Muster Pilot from Western Australia says, "You're not only flying the machine (often at low level), but you're also constantly thinking about where are the other pilots that you're flying with, how the muster is going in terms of daylight left and distance, where the fuel is, communicating with the ground crew on where horses/motorbikes are, how the cattle are travelling and basically trying to be 10 steps ahead of everything."

Before getting the job of a muster pilot, an extra 15 hours of low flying is needed in addition to the 110 hours for a standard license. Under Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) guidelines, they need to have a mustering endorsement by getting a minimum of 10 hours training with an approved mustering instructor. After that, they still have a long way to go. They need to work for another 1-2 years with a contract mustering team and will undergo a series of practices with the supervision of a senior pilot prior to commencing a single chopper mustering activity.

Safety is the utmost priority in this line of work, not just for the pilot but as well as the cattle. There's more to aerial mustering than just chasing these cattle in helicopters. A good knowledge of animal welfare and stock handling is significant to the operations, which is why there are now stock handling schools in Australia to educate farm owners, stockmen and especially pilots in working with the animals.

As the aerial mustering industry continues to grow, the demand for mustering pilots has also increased, especially with the contribution it has brought to the beef production sustainability. As of the moment there are more than 500 but not less than 1000 mustering pilots in Australia. Although it may sound a cool profession, it's not as cool as people think it is, considering all the work that needs to be done. And it's definitely not cool in the dry, hot, dusty Australian outback.

"Days off aren't rostered and is dependent upon how many stations are mustering that day and the number of machines required. This can make it difficult to plan or commit to anything outside work." - Nina

Mustering season takes month and even almost a year especially in the larger stations. Months of hard work being away from families, long days spent in camps and nights spend in swags on the ground. There's no such things as weekends or holidays. Every day is a busy day for the men and women, their horses and machines.


If you want to know more about the helicopter mustering industry, this website has everything you need. Or, check out Craig Gifford's channel on YouTube for awesome heli-mustering videos. 


Are you a pilot with cool travel stories that you want to share? Send us a message on our social media accounts Facebook , Instragram or send us an e-mail at charlyne@airnavigation.aero .


to discover more about the Flight planning application Air Navigation Pro iOS, 
you can also visit our website at 
and check the manual for additional details on how to use the new features.


Blue Skies, 
The Air Navigation Team
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08 March 2019

Air Navigation Pro Monthly Inbox - February 2019


While our team of developers continue to work on making the app better and more functional for you our valued users, we, the support team at Air Navigation Pro will also make sure that we're giving enough assistance to reach out to your concerns and needs. In line with this, we compile the top five frequently asked questions and write it on our monthly inbox wherein we answer these questions. We also add other essential information to serve as a reference for all of our users whenever they need it.

In case you missed last month's monthly inbox, you can read it here.

Here are the top five frequently asked questions for the month of February:

1. How to delete recorded flights from the device?

Recorded flights are categorized in months, under the Flight Recorder section in Tools. In order to delete a recorded flight:

For iOS, go to Tools >> Flight Recorder >> Recorded flights >> swipe each flight from right to left




For Android, go to Tools >> Flight Tracking >> Recorded flights >> swipe each flight from right to left and tap delete.




Before you decide to delete a recorded flight, you might consider synchronizing it to your Services account so you can still access it. For iOS devices, you can tap on a recorded flight and select "Push to web" to sync. For Android, select "Share on the web". Don't forget to login your Air Navigation Services account.

2. How can I disable the airspaces ahead alert?

The airspaces alert is another factor that helps you increase your situational awareness. When you're about to enter a particular airspace, you will receive an Alert five minutes beforehand. You can disable this feature and you can also choose the list of airspaces that you want to get an alert from.

To disable the airspaces alert, toggle off the button "Airspaces ahead alert"

For iPhone/iPad, go to Configuration >> Alerts >> Airspaces Ahead Alert



For Android tablet/smartphone, go to Flight Parameters >> Alerts >> Airspaces Ahead Alert




3. I bought Air Navigation Pro Android previous version (3.0). Can I install and access the app in my iOS device?

Now that both Air Navigation Pro Android and iOS  are free to download on Play Store and App Store, purchasing a package subscription will allow you to unlock your subscription freely on both Android and iOS applications. 

For add-on products, there's no need to buy them again. You can just sync it on your devices by connecting it your services account.


4. How can I display in the app the information of the speed, distance, destination, etc.?

The lower section of the app where you see the information of the speed, distance, destination, etc. is called the Data bar. In order to display it, tap Resize icon.

For Android smartphones, go to the floating widget for the different options and tap the resize icon - fourth button down




For iPhone, go to the floating widget for the different options and tap the resize icon - fourth button down.





5. How do I find my ATC flightplan credit?

For the meantime, this feature is applicable in Air Navigation Pro iOS only.

In order do this, go to the store and tap the tab restore. ATC Flightplan credit will  show how much is the remaining credit that you are entitled. Remember to always connect your Air Navigation Services account from the application.





You can also do this on the services website. Go to the Services site, login your account then go to Store. Click "All my Products". It will show the list of your products including your ATC Flight Plan Credit.



If you have questions that are not listed above, feel free to leave a comment below or message us on Facebook or visit our FAQ page and support center .

Are you a pilot with cool travel stories that you want to share? Send us a message on our social media accounts Facebook , Instragram or send us an e-mail at charlyne@airnavigation.aero .


to discover more about the Flight planning application Air Navigation Pro in iOS and Android, 
you can also visit our website at 
and check the manual for additional details on how to use the new features.


Blue Skies, 
The Air Navigation Team
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